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On the song “Night,” from Sean Rowe’s forthcoming ANTIdebut, Magic, the singer turns his rich, unnerving baritone to a moment of childhood innocence. Back then, he muses, you could fall “like a floating leaf,” and the earth would “look up at you and smile.” Rowe’s deep, magical voice is nothing if not wise and experienced; he knows full well that after the innocence comes the fall. “Night,” a conversation between an ailing father and son, and “Wet,” written from the perspective of a boy watching his mother go through hell, wrap tales of troubled childhoods in the deep protective warmth of Rowe’s voice. The voice and plaintive melodies comfort the listener, just as Rowe himself sought comfort in two constants throughout his nomadic, latchkey boyhood: nature and music.

“It didn’t really matter what I was listening to,” he says, “I would just listen to whatever I could find around the house, whether it was the Beach Boys or REO Speedwagon.” Getting lost in music was his survival instinct, a sort of “meditation,” as Rowe refers to it. In the kitchen, his mother would have to fight the melodies in his head for attention. “I’d just be in the corner, humming, making up songs,” he says, adding with a laugh, “I was a weird kid.” But his mother was used to a house full of melody. “Everyone on my mother’s side of the family played or sang, mostly big band era, the classics, but folk, too,” he says. “And my uncle was always giving me harmonicas, which I would sell for candy.”

For Rowe, an avid naturalist, his love for the wilderness dates back as far as he can remember back to when he first fixated on the Native American images on his bed sheets as a little boy. He fed this fascination with trips to natural history museums with his aunt. “I would just go get lost in there,” he remembers. “I studied everything about Native American life and customs that I could.” In 2007 Rowe spent 24 days virtually alone in the woods of Cherry Valley, NY on a solo survival quest carrying little more then the clothes on his back and a pocket knife. “It was probably the most powerful experience of my life!”

Magic was recorded in the small upstate town of Troy, New York, in a studio above the space where Sean’s grandfather once ran an Italian restaurant. The recording process, as he describes it, was intimate and incredibly specific. Brushes of fingertips on strings, hushed breaths, even the darkness of the studio seeps its way into the record, enhancing its live, trembling feel. “I wanted to create an abyss, something to take you far away, a dark but familiar space for people to get lost in,” he explains.

Rowe’s honest and haunting songwriting have already earned comparisons to Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks phase, for his abstract lyric phrasing, and the way he crafts an experience of emotion, rather than telling a linear tale. Most powerfully he brings to mind Leonard Cohen, with songwriting which tends to build into powerful, yet vulnerable, cathedral like monuments of sound. The song “American,” with its yearning strings and earnest piano bring chills and a catch in your throat. Magic is Sean Rowe’s homage to what he believes in, to what he finds magical in the world. The themes of love, innocence, sex and nature prevail in its heartfelt,
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crafted songs. On the ambient, deeply resonant closer “The Long Haul,” Rowe’s voice crackles with life. “And I never hit the spring so hard/ a newborn song on an old guitar/ and I know what it means to be alive,” he sings. And like the most evocative, important works of art, Magic begs the question of its listener: What makes you feel alive?Apr 13, 2018 The Warehouse at StageOne, Fairfield, CT

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Longley’s songs swell with honesty and genuine emotion that most of us are unable to admit to but recognize all the same.”, declared “The Telegraph” of New Hampshire. Even music icon John Mayer, who surprised Liz and fellow Berklee music students when he broke into an impromptu rendition of Liz’s song “Queen”, has described her music as “Gorgeous just gorgeous!”

The internet has been equally effusive about Longley’s music. Liz was voted the No. The song became the No.

This past spring, Longley earned the Berklee College of Music Songwriting Division Achievement Award. Moreover, her song “Whatever Goes Up” was ranked the No. 2 song overall in the well regarded competition. The song also garnered the all time No.

Liz is often accompanied by guitar talent Sarah Zimmermann. The two team up for engaging vocal harmonies and a rapport with audiences that is filling coffeehouses and venues throughout the region. Liz has performed at the Philly Folkfest, Club Passim’s in Boston, Tupelo Hall in New Hampshire, and Philly’s World Cafe. He has played lead guitar for The New York Dolls, Alberta Cross Todd Snider. Tasjan is also a frequent musical collaborator with Kevn Kinney, Anton Fier and Tim Easton. Mar 25, 2018 The Caverns, Pelham, TNMar 31, 2018 Ships of The Sea Maritime Museum Gardens, Savannah, GAApr 20, 2018 The Basement East, Nashville, TNApr 24, 2018 Port City Music Hall, Portland, MEApr 25, 2018 Paradise Rock Club, Boston, MA

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The Dick Dale Phenomenon. His style is something different and unique. Since his first appearances Balboa, Ca. at the famed Rendezvous Ballroom, he has set and broken attendance records everywhere he’s performed. His appearances at the Rendezvous Ballroom broke every existing record for the Ballroom by drawing capacity crowds of over four thousand screaming dancing fans every weekend each night down on the Balboa peninsula.

Dick Dale invented surf music in the 1950’s. Not the ’60’s as is commonly believed. He was given the title “King of the Surf Guitar” by his fellow surfers with whom he surfed with from sun up to sun down. He met Leo Fender the guitar and amplifier Guru and Leo asked Dale to play his newly creation, the Fender Stratocaster Electric Guitar. The minute Dale picked up the guitar, Leo Fender broke into uncontrolled laughter and disbelief, he was watching Dale play a right handed guitar upside down and backwards, Dale was playing a right handed guitar left handed and changing the chords in his head then transposing the chords to his hands to create a sound never heard before.

Leo Fender gave the Fender Stratocaster along with a Fender Amp to Dale and told him to beat it to death and tell him what he thought of it. Dale took the guitar and started to beat it to death, and he blew up Leo Fender’s amp and blew out the speaker. Dale proceeded to blow up forty nine amps and speakers; they would actually catch on fire. Leo would say, ‘Dick, why do you have to play so loud?’ Dale would explain that he wanted to create the sound of Gene Krupa the famous jazz drummer that created the sounds of the native dancers in the jungles along with the roar of mother nature’s creature’s and the roar of the ocean.

Leo Fender kept giving Dale amps and Dale kept blowing them up! Till one night Leo and his right hand man Freddy T. went down to the Rendezvous Ballroom on the Balboa Peninsula in Balboa, California and stood in the middle of Four Thousand screaming dancing Dick Dale fans and said to Freddy, I now know what Dick Dale is trying to tell me. Back to the drawing board. A special 85 watt output transformer was made that peaked 100 watts when dale would pump up the volume of his amp, this transformer would create the sounds along with Dale’s style of playing, the kind of sounds that Dale dreamed of. BUT! they now needed a speaker that would handle the power and not burn up from the volume that would come from Dale’s guitar.

Leo, Freddy and Dale went to the James B. Lansing speaker company, and they explained that they wanted a fifteen inch speaker built to their specifications. That speaker would soon be known as the 15” JBL D130 speaker. It made the complete package for Dale to play through and was named the Single Showman Amp. When Dale plugged his Fender Stratocaster guitar into the new Showman Amp and speaker cabinet, Dale became the first creature on earth to jump from the volume scale of a modest quiet guitar player on a scale of 4 to blasting up through the volume scale to TEN! That is when Dale became the “Father of Heavy Metal” as quoted from Guitar Player Magazine. Dale broke through the electronic barrier limitations of that era!

Dale still wanted to go further, and as the crowds increased, Dale’s volume increased, but he still wanted a bigger punch with thickness in the sound so that it would pulsate into the audience and leave them breathless. The JBL D130 was doing its job until Dale froze it in the frame that held the speaker, the speaker cone would twist from the heavy playing from Dale and it would soon twist and stop to fluctuate back n forth.

Leo, Freddy and Dale went back to the JBL speaker company and told them to rubberize the front ridge of the speaker allowing it to push forward and backward from the signal of Dale’s guitar without cocking and twisting. The new updated version was called the JBL D 130F;
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the F stood for Fender.